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Arden Med Spa

Water Pills

Diuretics, also known as "water pills," are the oldest and most affordable class of medication to treat high blood pressure. They help remove salt and water from the body through the kidneys.

 This procedure reduces blood volume, requiring the heart to pump less blood with each beat, thus lowering blood pressure. Diuretics are usually- recommended for people with congestive heart failure due to excess fluid retention (a condition known as edema).

Not surprisingly, frequent urination is one of the most common side effects of taking water pills. 

Dizziness, fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, and muscle cramps are possible side effects. Erectile dysfunction can strike men at any time.

Water Pills near me

Water Pills

People with high blood pressure or heart failure are often- advised to reduce their sodium and salt intake. Salt substitutes are one way to do this, but they are high in potassium - a quarter of a teaspoon contains about 800 mg of potassium. Potassium-sparing diuretics should be -avoided.

Apart from- removing excess salt from the body, diuretics also affect potassium levels. This mineral is important for regulating blood pressure, as well as for nerve and muscle function. 

In general, the kidneys help control potassium levels in the blood. However, kidney function can be affected by age, diabetes, heart failure, and many other diseases.

 While some water pills work to lower potassium levels, others work in the opposite- direction.

Chlorothiazide (Diuryl), Chlorthalidone (Hygroton) and Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril, Microzides) are thiazide diuretics that tend to lower potassium levels.

 Bumetanide (Bumex) and furosemide, for example, are loop diuretics (Lasix).

Potassium-sparing diuretics such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and eplerenone (Inspra) prevent potassium loss. However, the problem may arise in the opposite direction.

 Too much potassium in the body can cause serious heart rhythm problems and possible heart failure.

People with high blood pressure or heart failure are often- advised to reduce their sodium and salt intake. 

Salt substitutes are one way to do this, but they are high in potassium - a quarter of a teaspoon contains about 800 mg of potassium. Potassium-sparing diuretics should be -avoided.